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in the silly analyses of what happened after quick contact states. clinton drastically lowered the capital gains tax and that was where most of the new revenues came. but in general, 50 nations around the world have reduced their tax rates since wealth and poverty was published. drastically reduce tax rates. most of eastern europe now has flat tax is. in all these countries, revenues have boomed. there hasn't been a big craze this is anime and estonia. this in a past and estonia with 12% flat tax. the fact is supply-side economics is booming around the world. it's only in the united states that soul-searching and from this economics of enterprise. >> what is your analysis of what is happening in what donald rumsfeld recalled old europe? >> old europe is fallen with the indulgent dilutions of the welfare state. they've all accepted dependence on a show i've government and bass have destroyed the value of their assets. when you destroy the value of your assets, ultimately the human beings who make your economy go our investments and creations of work after. when you'd appreciate this asset,
clinton and state counselors have been engaging for some time, and that is can we get a better answer than we have had in the past two how a new rise in power comes to the international system. and can we do so without running significant risks or indeed fall into conflict. >> thanks. please. >> i agree with everything the undersecretary has said your, and, in fact, admiral sam locklear underscore those pushes a couple days ago in australia. talking about engagement and that strategic trust. but it's interesting that the chinese tend to look at the american, ma asia pacific give it a sort of a continuing strategy. which speaks to the inability to really communicate with strategic effect. and i think you touched, steve, on a very important piece which was a seniority complex and if i can put it that way. china has felt that they were abused by major powers to the 19th century and well into the 20 century, and that has an interesting counterbalance, which is a seemed a bit of a superiority complex about the solutions that they are building on how china images as a global power. the disconten
revolutionary guard corps. hillary clinton a couple years ago said iran was edging close league to be in the military to peter should. i wonder when marina talks about this long history of abuse of political prisoners by the agents of that abuse had changed over this 20, 30 year span and whether the increased role has an impact on the human rights landscape. is the power of military know me making matters worse? >> thank you very much, ladies and gentlemen. and thanks to ftd for arranging a panel discussion about human rights. it's rather interesting that in the city in washington d.c., most panels about iran are about the nuclear program. that is almost nothing that the human rights program. the iranian audience in the reading public because it means you care about your own security. you care about the implications of the islamic republic coming into an armed state. what happens in iran does not really matter to washington. this is the signal washington has been sending to iran and i think this panel and ftd's initiative to make human rights issue a more important issue on agen
and -- the revolutionary guard corps and hillary clinton said iran is edging closer to being a military dictatorship. i wonder when marina talks about this kind of long history of abuse of political prisoners, whether the agents of that abuse have changed over this 20-30 year span, and whether the increased role of the irgc has an impact on the human rights landscape? is the power of the military in iran actually making matters even worse? >> thanks very much, ladies and gentlemen, and thanks for arranging a panel discussion about human rights. it's rather interesting that in this city, washington, dc. most panels about iran are about the nuclear program and almost nothing about the political prisoners. it send a terrible signal to the iranian public because it means you do care about your own security, you do care about the implications of the islamic republic becoming a nuclear armed state, but what happens in iran does not matter to the washington elite. this is the signal washington has been sending to iran, and i think this panel and initiative to make human rights issue more important issue on th
problems. we firmly believe in this. i find it interesting that secretary clinton's last visit to the continent she expanded on that and said, yes, african solutions to african challenges but we need african solutions ss and participation in global challenges as well and that's a recognition of the evolving nature of things in africa. there are two documents that broadly guide what we do in africa, and those, i would commend -- probably most of you have probably read them. the first is the presidential policy directive for subsaharaan africa, and it is based on four pillars. the first, to promote opportunity and development. secondly. to spur economic growth, trade and investment. thirdly, to advance peace and security. and fourth, to strengthen democratic institutions. insurprisingly, we at u.s. a africa command focus on the third, building peace and security. but as a necessary precondition to achieving the other four objectives. so, again, i think it's best to think of us in, again, a supporting and enabling role. the second document that guide our principles as the defense
committee following a leadership of chairman clinton. we are in a tight schedule and 5 like to call up senator kc. i would be remiss if i did not recognize the presence here today of lieutenant-colonel larry lerlach. he was commander of an amphibious unit in lebanon. in october of 1983 hezbollah terrorists drove two trucks and exploded the american and french marine barracks. he survived it, 241 american women did not. he is here today with us. we thank you so much for your service and honoring us. [applause] >> welcome again to the foundation for defense of democracy's annual washington forum. my name is kenneth schwartz. i have the pleasure of introducing distinguished public official robert kc, senior senator from the state of pennsylvania. you served since 2007 as chairman of near east and south asia subcommittee, senate foreign relations committee only in the first term. one can scarcely imagine a more challenging time, the past two years in the middle east have seen wars in international borders, collapse of regimes in decades and the rise of political movements that may yet turn
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6